"I photograph the everyday, the familiar in unfamiliar places. ‘The mundane is given its beautiful due in that it is photographed at all,' suggests photographer Anna Shustikova. Structures left behind; dated, discarded, curious. Rural communities, along back-roads, and within once-thriving urban neighborhoods; these are my vistas. I am hopeful that my photographs are reminders of humanness, culture, and community."

 

llinois Central College; University of Illinois;

Juried Illinois Artisan for Photography.

Wilson was a medical/surgical and generalist photographer and writer during his 33-year career in health care and for many years cut steel in a foundry and drove a truck for a time. 

Design. I’ve always been intrigued by design. Lines, shapes, forms, color, values and space and how everything fits together. When I was very young, I'd study pictures of flags of nations. At first it was as simple as colors and shapes. Later, it became about the why. Why particular colors, shapes, and objects were used and what it all meant.

‚Äč    That led to an interest in history, art history, culture, society and such. It wasn’t a stretch then when farther along I found myself curious about folks like Ad Reinhardt, Ellsworth Kelly, Robert Motherwell, Mark Rothko, Fritz Bultman, Pat Passlof, and then later Richard Diebenkorn and later-still David Hockney. All painters. William Eggleston said of his photographs “They are like little paintings.” That’s it, exactly.

     I’ve found myself moving toward a more minimalist documentary compact-style. Each subject treated with singular focus and presentation. I draw from a regional palette of rural communities, crisscrossing back roads and, occasionally, urban environments. I travel light, camera hand-held, monopod or tripod as needed. I work with the weather and light I’m given.

    While some rural communities have diminished, some thrive. I never know what I’ll find. I seek out locals for conversation, direction, thoughts, memories. I understand going-in I am suspect. Everyone knows you’re a stranger. Cafes, gas stations, convenience stores, farm implement and supply stores are perfect for conversation. Everyone has a story. There is an emotional tug, a line that travels back decades throughout my life and the lives of my parents and their parents.

Member, Center for Photography at Woodstock, NY; Member, Center for Fine Art Photography, Fort Collins, CO

Friend, Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago; Member, Peoria Art Guild https://www.peoriaartguild.org/